2017-18-I Kutatásmódszertan (ENG)

Részletes leírás: 
The course offers a reading and discussion of major topoi of research methodology, both from the point of view of the actual research practice, from the point of view of traditional epistemology and philosophy, and from the point of view of empirical research in science, cognition and social learning. The course thematizes overlaps in approaches, gives an introduction to their core concepts, and surveys recent contributions that connect contemporary approaches. The aim is to foster both enculturation in science and nature of science issues that concern research-methodology as well as sensitivity and responsiveness to philosophical issues.

 

 

Teaching methods: Frontal teaching, Individual and group work, Home-work

Requirements and assessment: Midterm test 30 % Presentation at the end-of semester 30 % In-Class activity 30% Optional Home-work: 10-40% (handouts, individual research)

Exams, make-up duties and make-up exams: The grade is composed of two frontal evaluations: a mid-term an end-term test (30-30%), In-class assignment, and homework (40%)

Office hours: On appointment: Monday 15:00-16:45; Wednesday 8:00-9:30 E 6th floor 605 / 612

12. Course material, compulsory and recommended readings: handouts and online resources, made available (see also course description)

Workload and detailed class schedule:

 

Topics to be discussed, readings required for the class, other assignments

Week 1

Errors in science

Allchin, Douglas: Error (Forthcoming) – available in manuscript

Week 2

Error, falsification and underdetermination

Rosenberg, Alex: (2012) Philosophy of science, a contemporary introduction, Routledge, New York. (201-218)

Week 3

Newton’s theory of vision I.

Fara, Patricia: (2015) Newton shows the light: a commentary on Newton (1672) ‘A letter … containing his new theory about light and colours…’

Week 4

Newton’s theory of vision II.

Newton, Isaac (1972) A Letter of Mr. Isaac Newton, Professor of the Mathematicks in the University of Cambridge; Containing His New Theory about Light and Colors: Sent by the Author to the Publisher from Cambridge, Febr. 6. 1671/72; In Order to be Communicated to the R. Society. Phil. Trans. 6, 3075–3087.

Week 5

Logic of science: connectives

Restall, Greg: (2006) Logic, Routledge, New York (6-26)

Week 6

Logic of science: deductive and inductive logic

Skyrms, Brian: (2000) Choice and Chance, Wadswhorth, London. (12-50)

Week 7

Confirmation and Bayesian statistics

Rosenberg, Alex: (2012) Philosophy of science, a contemporary introduction, Routledge, New York. (179-218)

Week 8

Mid-Term Test

Week 9

Research in practice I.

Week 10

Debate analysis and dialectics I.

Week 11

Debate analysis and dialectics II.

Week 12

Writing skills and research reports

Schimmel, Joshua: (2011) Writing Science, Oxford University Press, Oxford. (26-35; 95-104)

Week 13

Preparing for scientific presentations and workshops

Week 14

Workshop of student presentations – end-term exam

 

 

Az órák friss hírei: 

For lesson 2: please read 16_1_error_handout_1.docx and search for a similar mistake/error in the history of science

Követelmények: 

Requirements

Mandatory readings

Lecture notes

Rosenberg, Alex: (2012) Philosophy of science, a contemporary introduction, Routledge, New York. (201-218)

+1 of these is necessary but you can choose which one depending on your interest

Fara, Patricia: (2015) Newton shows the light: a commentary on Newton (1672) ‘A letter … containing his new theory about light and colours…’

Skyrms, Brian: (2000) Choice and Chance, Wadswhorth, London. (12-29)

Rosenberg, Alex: (2012) Philosophy of science, a contemporary introduction, Routledge, New York. (179-199)